How Much CO2 do you Create?

 The Average Annual U.S. Household produced about 49 metric tons of CO2 . 

The average U.S. household pumps 49 metric tons of carbon into the atmosphere each year, according to a U.C. Berkeley California consortium.

Obviously it can vary considerably from that based up lifestyles, but its a good place to start. For perspective, the global average was about five tons of carbon dioxide per person in 2013.

Here's a very general breakdown of some of the items in that figure.

Commuting to work
4.3 metric tons of CO2 per year.

If you commute 30 miles round-trip to work, which is about average, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation, that's about 7,800 commuting miles each year. And if you drive a car that gets 22 miles to the gallon every weekday, your annual carbon footprint from commuting is 4.3 metric tons.

Airplanes

2.23 Tons of CO2 for each airplane flight coast to coast.

If you live on the West Coast and fly to the East Coast, (in the economy section), that’s about a 5,000-mile round trip, making your carbon footprint from this airplane trip alone 2.23 tons of CO2.

Food

0.8 metric tons of carbon dioxide for red meat.

If you're eating 444 calories a day of red meat (the equivalent of about one 8-ounce steak sirloin), your annual meat-related carbon footprint is about 0.8 metric tons of carbon dioxide.

Shopping

0.5 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year.
Buying $100 of clothes each month will set you back 0.5 metric tons of carbon dioxide per year.

Laundry

0.2 metric tons of CO2 per year.

1.8 kg CO2 per load. Drying two loads of laundry per week puts 187.2 kg CO2 or 0.2 metric tons of CO2 per year.

Again these figures are very general and can vary considerably based upon your lifestyle. This is average in the US.